image


Metallic Minerals

In the past, various metal ores were mined in Arkansas. Since 1990, no ores were mined for their metal content. This listing presents the last year of recorded mining.

All have had a significant role in the state's economy and history. The first metal to be mined was galena, which was used by early pioneers as a source of lead for bullets. The annual production of lead increased markedly during the Civil War. During World War I, lead, zinc, and antimony were produced in Arkansas due to higher metal prices. During World War II, expanded production of aluminum in Arkansas was vital to the military aircraft industry. However, since 1990, no metal has been made from any ore mined in the state. This situation is due to changing world market conditions, the discovery of commercial deposits elsewhere in the world, and increasing labor, energy, and environmental costs in the United States.

A number of other metal-bearing minerals have been reported, but none have been discovered in sufficient quantities to qualify as ores. The metals include gold, molybdenum, nickel, niobium (columbium), the rare earth metals, thorium, and uranium. Further exploration, additional analyses, changing market conditions, and new processing methods may lead industry to mine some of these metals and renew mining of formerly produced metals.

To download the ADEQ Access 2000 database of all permitted operations in Arkansas click here.


West District (South of Arkansas River)
Aluminum (1982) Manganese (1959)
Antimony (1947) Mercury (1946)
Copper (1900) Silver (1927)
Gallium (1983) Titanium (1944)
Iron (1965) Vanadium (1990)
Lead (1959) Zinc (1962)
*bauxite for the production of metallic aluminum

PDF Arkansas Mineral Resources Map
PDF USGS Mineral Production Map
image
Aluminum

The third most abundant element in the earth’s crust, aluminum (Al) is, nevertheless, a relatively new metal to the human race.
Learn more »

image
Antimony

Many minerals contain antimony (Sb), a soft white metal with a low melting point.
Learn more »

image
Cobalt

Cobalt (Co) is a silvery gray metal which has a relatively high specific gravity (8.9), and is hard, ductile, malleable, and magnetic.
Learn more »

image
Copper

Copper (Cu), called the red metal, was one of the first metals used by man.
Learn more »


image
Aluminum

The third most abundant element in the earth’s crust, aluminum (Al) is, nevertheless, a relatively new metal to the human race.
Learn more »

image
Antimony

Many minerals contain antimony (Sb), a soft white metal with a low melting point.
Learn more »


image
Cobalt

Cobalt (Co) is a silvery gray metal which has a relatively high specific gravity (8.9), and is hard, ductile, malleable, and magnetic.
Learn more »

image
Copper

Copper (Cu), called the red metal, was one of the first metals used by man.
Learn more »


image
Gallium

Gallium (Ga) is a metal which does not form distinct minerals, but substitutes for aluminum in the structure of many aluminum-bearing minerals.
Learn more »

image
Gold

No metal has gained attention throughout history as has gold. Gold (Au) was one of the earliest metals to be utilized due largely it exists as a native metal.
Learn more »

image
Iron

When considering the entire composition of the earth, iron (Fe) is the most abundant element, but it only comprises approximately 6 percent of continental crust.
Learn more »

image
Lithium

Lithium (Li) is the lightest of all the metals, having an atomic weight of 6.939 and a specific gravity of 0.534.
Learn more »


image
Gallium

Gallium (Ga) is a metal which does not form distinct minerals, but substitutes for aluminum in the structure of many aluminum-bearing minerals.
Learn more »

image
Gold

No metal has gained attention throughout history as has gold. Gold (Au) was one of the earliest metals to be utilized due largely it exists as a native metal.
Learn more »


image
Iron

When considering the entire composition of the earth, iron (Fe) is the most abundant element, but it only comprises approximately 6 percent of continental crust.
Learn more »

image
Lithium

Lithium (Li) is the lightest of all the metals, having an atomic weight of 6.939 and a specific gravity of 0.534.
Learn more »


image
Manganese

Manganese (Mn) is a gray-white to silvery metal with a moderate melting temperature and relatively high specific gravity (7.2 to 7.4).
Learn more »

image
Mercury

Elemental mercury (Hg) is relatively scarce and is formed by the weathering or oxidation of several mercury-bearing minerals.
Learn more »

image
Molybdenum

Molybdenum (Mo) is a refractory metal that is obtained primarily by processing the mineral molybdenite (MoS2).
Learn more »

image
Nickel

Nickel (Ni) is the fifth most abundant element in the earth, but it is rare in crustal rocks.
Learn more »


image
Manganese

Manganese (Mn) is a gray-white to silvery metal with a moderate melting temperature and relatively high specific gravity (7.2 to 7.4).
Learn more »

image
Mercury

Elemental mercury (Hg) is relatively scarce and is formed by the weathering or oxidation of several mercury-bearing minerals.
Learn more »


image
Molybdenum

Molybdenum (Mo) is a refractory metal that is obtained primarily by processing the mineral molybdenite (MoS2).
Learn more »

image
Nickel

Nickel (Ni) is the fifth most abundant element in the earth, but it is rare in crustal rocks.
Learn more »


image
Niobium

Niobium (Cb), also called columbium, is a rare metal, which is steel gray, resistant to acids, and has a high melting point.
Learn more »

image
Rare Earths

The rare earth metals are a family of 17 elements consisting of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanum-group elements.
Learn more »

image
Silver

Silver (Ag) has been an important metal since ancient times. Often present as a native element possessing readily workable properties of malleability, ductility, and sectility, silver was easily fashioned into ornaments, utensils, and coinage.
Learn more »

image
Strontium

Strontium (Sr) is a soft, silvery, easily oxidized metallic element with a relatively low melting point and low specific gravity (2.54).
Learn more »


image
Niobium

Niobium (Cb), also called columbium, is a rare metal, which is steel gray, resistant to acids, and has a high melting point.
Learn more »

image
Rare Earths

The rare earth metals are a family of 17 elements consisting of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanum-group elements.
Learn more »


image
Silver

Silver (Ag) has been an important metal since ancient times. Often present as a native element possessing readily workable properties of malleability, ductility, and sectility, silver was easily fashioned into ornaments, utensils, and coinage.
Learn more »

image
Strontium

Strontium (Sr) is a soft, silvery, easily oxidized metallic element with a relatively low melting point and low specific gravity (2.54).
Learn more »


image
Tantalum

Tantalum (Ta) is a refractory, acid resistant, ductile and easily fabricated metal with a high melting temperature (2,996° Celsius).
Learn more »

image
Thorium

Thorium (Th) is a radioactive metallic element that, until the 1950’s, was known only by chemists and physicists.
Learn more »

image
Titanium

Titanium (Ti) is a lightweight metal which was discovered in 1791 and is known for its corrosion resistance and high strength-to-weight ratio.
Learn more »

image
Uranium

Uranium (U) minerals are classified as primary and secondary.
Learn more »


image
Tantalum

Tantalum (Ta) is a refractory, acid resistant, ductile and easily fabricated metal with a high melting temperature (2,996° Celsius).
Learn more »

image
Thorium

Thorium (Th) is a radioactive metallic element that, until the 1950’s, was known only by chemists and physicists.
Learn more »


image
Titanium

Titanium (Ti) is a lightweight metal which was discovered in 1791 and is known for its corrosion resistance and high strength-to-weight ratio.
Learn more »

image
Uranium

Uranium (U) minerals are classified as primary and secondary.
Learn more »


image
Vanadium

Vanadium (V) is a metal with a moderate specific gravity (6.0) and a relatively high melting point (1710° C).
Learn more »

image
Zinc & Lead

Zinc (Zn) is a bluish-white lustrous metal that is brittle at room temperature, but malleable when heated.
Learn more »


image
Vanadium

Vanadium (V) is a metal with a moderate specific gravity (6.0) and a relatively high melting point (1710° C).
Learn more »

image
Zinc & Lead

Zinc (Zn) is a bluish-white lustrous metal that is brittle at room temperature, but malleable when heated.
Learn more »